2018 world’s best images: 200-year-old documentarian captures historic images across the globe

Hundreds of photographs created by one photographer have been unveiled. Winners of the 2021 Historical Photographer of the Year contest were announced in a press conference in Norwich, England, Thursday. Visions of Trump are…

2018 world’s best images: 200-year-old documentarian captures historic images across the globe


Hundreds of photographs created by one photographer have been unveiled.

Winners of the 2021 Historical Photographer of the Year contest were announced in a press conference in Norwich, England, Thursday.

Visions of Trump are displayed

The competition is an annual competition and photo exhibition organized by the Network of Norwich Historical Collections.

The winners in the photographic categories of the competition were selected by a jury of over 20 photographic experts and curators.

The judges selected some of the categories for the modern and historical perspective.

The period category has four winners – film, digital, nitrate and photographic.

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Winners have been named for the Victorian, Victorian-inspired, Georgian, Queen Anne and Victorian-Era themes.

In the contemporary category for the new and innovative subject matter, there were three winners, including the first runner-up for the transformation of Kenwood House in the modern category.

The digital category has won the first runner-up.

In the documentation category, there were two first runner-up and three second runners-up.

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The 16th Annual Tour of Memories photographic exhibition of the winning images will be opened to the public on Monday January 7 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at The Old Guild House, 31 Park Place, Norwich, England.

Winners will then be taking part in an exhibition tour through many of the counties of England.

The jury included UK Lincolnshire Historical Association Chief Executive Colin Reed and Victorian Society Director Deborah Campbell.

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